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The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

All good stories have a twist, and all great storytellers are just a little twisted. Join me for a different take on the people and events that you thought you knew, from pop culture to politics, Hollywood to history… The Way I Heard It is a series of short mysteries for the curious mind with a short attention span.

DISCLAIMER: Each episode of The Way I Heard It is a true story about a real person, place, or thing. With respect to the facts, I try to be as accurate as possible. However, the Internet is full of conflicting accounts, and it’s entirely possible you might hear me say something about a person or an event that contradicts something you heard or read elsewhere. If so, feel free to bring any discrepancy to my attention. Just remember – I’m not wrong. It’s just the way I heard it…

Jan 26, 2021

“When it comes to erections, if it’s not one thing, it’s your mother.” Yes, Mike actually wrote that in chapter 7 of his bestselling book, and as you might imagine, his mother didn’t take it lying down…


Jan 19, 2021

Why do people go to such extraordinary lengths to change the way they look? What’s the best piece of music ever written? And why is Mike worried about getting cancelled and sued for the conversation you’re about to hear? There’s only one way to find out…


Jan 12, 2021

After reading chapter 5 of his bestselling book, Mike surprises his two-time bestselling mother with a phone call, on which they discuss the perils of prevarication, the joys of growing up Rowe, (on a budget,) and Peggy Rowe’s unsolicited review of Mike’s new show, Six Degrees with Mike Rowe, which she may or may...


Jan 5, 2021

After reading chapter four of his book, Mike and Chuck discuss the real reason that so many Americans no longer believe people who sound certain - including journalists, politicians, scientists, doctors, professors, and yes… even narrators.


Dec 15, 2020

After Mike shares chapter three of his book he gives a spirited defense of the critical art of salesmanship, during which Chuck accuses him of being a sellout, and the two navigate the precarious world of commercial television vs commercials.